Are You A Social Media Oversharer?

social media“Going out to see the in-laws this week­end. Should be a blast!”“Going out of town on a 4 day vaca­tion. Can’t wait to see the ocean, eat some good seafood, and spend some time with my wife!”“I just don’t know how the dogs are going to be able to cope at the dog ken­nel for the next two weeks until we get back.”

What do all of these state­ments have in com­mon? Two things, really:

They indi­cate that you are going to be out of town for an extended period of time.

They indi­cate that you are likely unin­ten­tion­ally shar­ing way too much infor­ma­tion about your­self on social networks.

Many peo­ple don’t real­ize it, but every­thing that is posted on your social net­work is con­sid­ered pub­lic domain – even when it is locked up as “pri­vate.” There is no pri­vacy when it comes to the inter­net, and search engines will pull your sta­tus updates from sites like Twit­ter for the entire world to see. And what do you think the iden­tity thief is think­ing, look­ing at your pro­file and see­ing that you’re going to be out of town? Yep – time to strike.

Now I’m not say­ing that you shouldn’t be on a social net­work hav­ing fun with your friends, fol­low­ers, col­leagues, and even com­plete strangers. What I am say­ing is that you should be care­ful about what you are shar­ing, how often you share it, and whom you share it with. The entire global com­mu­nity doesn’t need to know you are going on vaca­tion for the next few days because that means your house is likely going to be empty. An iden­tity thief could break in, look for your small fire­proof safe that likely con­tains all your con­fi­den­tial infor­ma­tion, steal it, and then pop the lock on their own time.

So how do you limit the infor­ma­tion that you share? First of all, ignore the temp­ta­tion to fully fill out your pro­files. The peo­ple who need to know that you like Space­balls, charm­ing walks on the beach late at night, and Mon­day Night Raw already know this about you any­way. Don’t share it.

Sec­ondly, be care­ful about upload­ing pic­tures from your mobile phone. This pic­tures con­tain GPS tags to them, which can be eas­ily traced to your spe­cific loca­tion. This can let an iden­tity thief know via your own uploaded pic­tures exactly where they need to go in your home to get the infor­ma­tion they need… and remem­ber, a finan­cial state­ment in the wrong hands is really all that is needed, and most peo­ple keep those in an unlocked file cabinet.

Thirdly, just watch what you are say­ing in your sta­tus updates. Not every­one needs to know that you go to the store around the same time of day to buy a Coke Zero. By doing this, you’re cre­at­ing a pat­tern of your activ­i­ties that can be eas­ily tracked, let­ting an iden­tity thief know where you are going to be so that they can take advan­tage of you.

By lim­it­ing the amount of infor­ma­tion that is avail­able to peo­ple online, you are tak­ing an easy step to pro­tect your­self and your iden­tity. So take a look at your sta­tus updates, see if you tend to unin­ten­tion­ally over­share, and make any changes you might need to make regard­ing your social net­work­ing activ­i­ties today.  Don’t fall victim to identity theft and fraud because you can’t keep your personal information to yourself.  If you have to share your entire life with the internet on a daily basis, please consider getting identity protection & credit monitoring.  You can read several reviews of the best plans at this site.  https://sites.google.com/site/allcreditmonitoringservices/

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